Frog Puddles Words To Song By Howard Whitney 1901

DSCO 1662Children’s Songs

‘Frog Puddles’.  A Jolly Old Song first published in 1901 by Allan & Co, Melbourne, Australia.  It was first recorded by Harry Bloom and his orchestra.

Frog Puddles was one of the earliest pieces I learnt to play on the piano.  We all learned this song down in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand, along with ‘Norwegian Cradle Song’, ‘Robin’s Return’, and ‘Remembrance’,  which were other popular pieces of the day.

‘Frog Puddles’ is a catchy little tune, with words which capture the imagination of children and adults alike. The imagery paints a brilliant little picture of frogs having fun in the moonlight, down by the silvery blue lagoon.

The cover of the music was equally appealling, I remember, with bright-eyed green frogs jumping about in a splash of  green and golden yellow background.  The biggest frog sits atop a giant mushroom, strumming his banjo.

I have just had the most wonderful holiday in Dunedin, where I spent Christmas with my daughter, her partner, and my grandson. The weather was fantastic, with three out of the four days I spent there being sunny and moderate.  We ate good food, played, visited the Botanical Gardens, and then Port Chalmers on the last day.   I took masses of photographs on my son-in-law’s camera, which they put onto a CD for me, and which I will share with you at a later date.

Singing songs to my grandson has always been a lot of fun.  He is very musical, and loves anybody singing to him, although he is quite choosy about the sort of song you sing, and whether he has heard something too often.  If he does not like a song he will tell you to stop immediately.

After a sudden burst of ‘total recall’, (which we watched – the Colin Farrel version- not as good as the Arnold Shwartznegger), which came about because of the singing of many old songs on Christmas Day, and the fact that the moon was almost full,  the ‘Frog Puddles’ words, which feature the golden moonlight, came to me.  After singing it once, the instruction came again and again – ‘One more time’.  That ‘Frog Puddles’ song was a real hit.

Since I have not been able to find the words online, I thought I would put up the words as I remember them, which is the first verse only, so that you can sing the song to your children and grandchildren.  The sheet music is available to buy online, and there is a free version, music only, which you can peruse.

Howard Whitney wrote many other little ditties, but I think that ‘Frog Puddles’, for which he wrote both music and lyrics, is the best.

Here is how I remember those words:

Chorus:

Every evening

Under the great big golden moon

Down by the sleepy blue lagoon

Froggies come out to play and spoon.

They go hopping

Under the great big golden moon

Everyone there

Having such fun

Neath the spell of the moon.

Verse:

Big Mister Bull Frog

He hops upon a brown log

Gives a funny croak

Has a little joke.

Then he goes hopping

And never ever stopping

Til he takes a header in the pool

(Splash!  Splash!)

Chorus again:

Every evening

Under the great big golden moon

Down by the silvery blue lagoon

Froggies come out to play and spoon.

They go hopping

Under the great big golden moon

Everyone there

Having such fun

Neath the spell of the moon.

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2 thoughts on “Frog Puddles Words To Song By Howard Whitney 1901

  1. Alan A. Hoysted Thomastown 3074 Victoria, Australia says:

    This bouncy little song popped into my head this morning. It was the these tune for a children’s program on regional radio station 3SR Shepparton [Victoria Australia] in the 1930’s. As a little kid I loved it, and will try to introduce it to the “Mainly Music” program attended by my Grandchildren. Thank you very much for preserving it!!

    • Thanks so much for your comment. Apologies for the length of time in replying. Great to hear that you do music therapy – I play piano to cheer up people in rest homes. Thank God for music…..
      Best Wishes,
      Merrilyn

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