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Kamakazi Japanese Retirees Will Sacrifice Their Lives 2011

Japan Nuclear Clean Up

“Our struggle for health is not at all isolated from our movement for a world free from wars, weapons, and exploitation”: Quote from Homeopathic Textbook.

And Germany sets a precedent for the rest of the world: GERMANY WILL BE NUCLEAR FREE BY 2022. This is surely the best news the world has had since i can remember. One good outcome has come from the terrible earthquake/tsunami/nuclear disaster in Japan on March 11, 2011.

Just today, on BBC News through the night, May 31st 2011, we were informed about the group of retired Japanese pensioners who have offered to go into the Fukushima nuclear plant to do the necessary work to shut down the reactors and make them safe. Radioactive material is still leaking into the sea from the Fukushima reactors, so it is of dire urgency that they are made safe. But actually working anywhere near or in, the nuclear reactors, is a very very dangerous experience, and is one which will shorten your life considerably, even if you do not die within a few months, or years, from radiation exposure.

This was sadly the fate of those brave people who went into the Chernobyl nuclear plant to attempt clean up after the nuclear disaster there in the 1990’s. These men and women did not last long after their work at the Chernobyl Nuclear power plant. Radiation exposure caused them all to die of cancer and other mysterious wasting diseases, within a few years. A rememberance service was given for these brave people only recently, to acknowledge the sacrifice they all made in order to protect, as much as they were able, the safety and health of their fellow countrymen. These Chernobyl volunteers could also be likened to the brave Kamakazi, and should be remembered for all time because of the sacrifices they made for the sake of their fellow countrymen, humankind and the environment.

After the earthquake tsunami disaster of March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant was damaged, causing a melt down, in three of the reactors. this has resulted in a major nuclear disaster. Dangerous levels of radiation are still being emitted from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, and clean up procedures are expected to go on until the beginning of next year, or longer.

Yasuteru Yamada, who is a retired engineer, has begun the movement for skilled veterans to join forces to clean up the nuclear mess at Fukushima. He says that it is wrong for the young people to be doing this work. Young people have a higher chance of getting cancer from exposure to the radiation, than do older people. Also, these young people have their lives ahead of them, with families to look after, and possibly more children to come. These children born of the men working in these radioactive environments will have very high chances of being born with defects. Some of the men working in these nuclear power plants will be made completely sterile, due to the radiation. Many will develop cancer and other wasting diseases.

Yasuteru Yamada says that he, and his retired friends, are at the end of their lives, so it makes sense for them to be working in this dangerous environment of nuclear radiation. Michio Ito is another retiree who has joined the group of workers to aid in the process of clean-up. About 200 people have so far volunteered. This is an incredible act of heroism which will benefit the whole of the country, at the probable expense of their lives.

Harsh weather and tropical storms have hit Japan’s Fukushima coastline over the past few days. This has caused even more devastation, with more nuclear fall-out and radioactive material leaking into the sea and onto the flooded ground.

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